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Thinking About Grad School?

22 Mar

Interesting blog post on the merits, and disadvantages, of pursuing a graduate degree in English.

https://corriganliteraryreview.wordpress.com/2016/03/21/grad-school-in-english/

Internship: Marketing and Communications Internship at the Baltimore Museum of Art

9 Mar

The Marketing & Communications Department at the Baltimore Museum of Art is seeking a Summer Intern to assist with upcoming projects. This intern will work on marketing materials for Artscape and other events. Other office duties such as data entry, copy writing, and advertisement coordination may be assigned as needed.

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

Data entry
Assist with evening and/or weekend events when needed
Copy writing
Project research
Skill Set Required

Qualifications:

Creative Writing
Computer literacy (Microsoft Office Suite, Windows based programs)
Good communications/phone skills
Preferred Areas of Study/Major(s)
English, Marketing, Communications, Public Relations
Internship Location
Baltimore, MD
Details
Semester: Summer (Jun – Aug)
Year: 2016
Hours per week: 1-10 hours
Workdays: Monday-Friday
Pay: No
Application Requirements:
Application Deadline: April 24, 2016
Required Documentation: Resume, Cover Letter, Other – Letter of Recommendation
Application InstructionsSummer Internship Program – 2016

The BMA offers Internships to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as recent graduates. These positions provide the opportunity for Interns to contribute to various Museum projects and activities while learning how a major institution functions on a day-to-day basis. Interns will be guided by their supervisor who will act as a mentor and teach them about their department’s function within the Museum.

Eligibility

Candidates must fulfill one of the following criteria:

Undergraduate student
Graduate student
Recent graduate from an accredited program
Commitment

Most positions will meet 1-2 days a week*
Selected candidates will be expected to start in June of 2016
* This time is subject to change depending on the unique schedule that will be created with each selected candidate.

Application Requirements

Cover Letter/Statement of Interest
Current Resume (that includes contact information)
Academic Transcript (unofficial is acceptable)
Letter of reference from a professor, academic advisor, or supervisor (only 1 letter will be accepted)
Application Deadline

All materials must be submitted by Sunday, April 24th, 2016.

Notification of Decision

All selected candidates will receive an e-mail detailing that they have been chosen for a Summer Internship no later than May 31st, 2016.

Sending Applications/Letters of Reference

All of your materials may be sent via the following options:

E-mail: volunteer@artbma.org*
Through the post:
ATTN: Rachel Sanchez

RE: Internship Application

The Baltimore Museum of Art

10 Art Museum Dr

Baltimore, MD 21218

* Preferred method of application submission.

No phone calls please.

* Unless otherwise noted, BMA internships are typically unpaid.

The Joshua Johnson Council Internships

The Museum does offer two paid positions aimed at increasing participation of minority groups who are underrepresented in the fields of museum programming and administration. If you are interested in applying for a JJC Stipend, please indicate this clearly in your cover letter/letter of intent. The two candidates selected to receive a JJC stipend ($1,000/ each) will be notified.

Q: May I apply for more than one open Internship opportunity?

A: Yes, you may apply for up to two open positions. Please reference them in your Cover Letter/Letter of Intent.

Q: What should I include in my Cover Letter/Letter of Intent?

A: Please include the position(s) for which you are applying and why you are interested in that department(s). Indicate any experience you may have and how the position(s) you are interested in will highlight your skills and help you learn more about the field. If you are applying for a Joshua Johnson Council stipend, please be sure to include this in your Letter.

Any additional questions may be sent to volunteer@artbma.org.

EN and IT (that’s Information technology, not Italian)! Yes!

30 Jul

This article from The Chronicle of Higher Ed is directed at people with Ph.Ds in the humanities, but is equally applicable to undergraduate humanities majors. An EN degree is applicable to a wide range of fields– even information technology. How? Here’s one reason offered by the author, who got his BA in English and then worked in tech for nearly a decade:

My love of literature meant I adapted well to the language-driven task of computer programming.

The article describes careers in IT particularly suitable for humanities majors: business analyst, technical communicator, and user-experience designer. Worth checking out!

IT: The Accidental Career for Ph.D.s

In Defense of Lib Arts AND Employability

4 Apr

From the Huffington Post education blog, Tom Vander Ark explains how he chose to major in something “marketable”–engineering & finance– and reports that “it’s taken decades of remedial humanities to augment my job training.”

He clearly describes the pros and cons of majoring in something like English or choosing something more “marketable.” Worth reading.

How English (and philosophy, and history) Work

3 Dec

Here is an article by Paula Krebs, dean of humanities at Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts, appearing in Vitae. It’s initially about how Victorian writers might respond to the recent and unfolding events in Ferguson, MO, but eventually widens its focus to talk about what people educated in the humanities (e.g., English, history, & philosophy majors) bring to the table, work-wise, that more narrowly educated people do not. Here’s an excerpt:

My former boss used to talk about the time he met a police officer who, it turned out, was an alumnus of our university. They got to talking, and my boss was really impressed with the officer’s perspective on his job and his community, his human-relations skills, and his sense of himself as a professional. The officer said he owed it all to his education. He had, it turned out, been a philosophy major. … We are not making a strong enough case for a liberal-arts education that helps students to understand the differences and connections between the ways that social sciences, humanities, and sciences see and act on the world. We undermine our own universities when we allow our students and the general public to see higher education as job preparation alone, rather than job preparation that is also preparation to be citizens and leaders who understand a complex world. It’s preparation to be a worker who understands the connections between work and the world in which it takes place. It’s preparation to be a worker who can invent his or her next job, not just apply for it.

See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/819-ferguson-and-the-liberal-arts

Thinking about law school? Check out this flowchart.

10 Oct

I found this flowchart both eye-opening and clarifying. It is complicated, but worth reading every path if you are thinking about going to law school for any reason: money, prestige, desire to effect social change, stability, or simply, because you aren’t really sure what you want to do after you graduate.

I ran across this while reading a piece in Vitae, a higher-education career site, written by a recent college grad who considered going to law school because he wanted to pursue social change. Although he got in to several top law programs, he decided not to go. You can read about his decision-making process, which includes many useful links for those facing the same decision, here.

A liberal arts degree for the artisan economy

28 Jul

An upbeat  PBS story on why liberal arts degrees, more so than business degrees, equip folks for success in the “artisan economy” of the 21st century. The short version: how the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the heart of the B.A. prepare you to make your own way in a world where career paths have become less clear and certain.

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/making-sense/get-a-liberal-arts-b-a-not-a-business-b-a-for-the-coming-artisan-economy/

 

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